Brazilian Armed Forces Strengthen the Nation’s Cyber Defense

first_imgThe protection of critical Brazilian infrastructure such as hydroelectric power plants, refineries, and telecommunications networks, is one of the critical focus areas for national defense. At least two of the Brazilian Army’s seven current strategic projects are designed to minimize infrastructure threats. In 2011, hackers conducted the first successful attack on Brazilian Army computers. They didn’t manage to compromise strategic information during the attack, but they copied names and personal data of service members. The criminals also demonstrated that they were capable of overcoming a firewall on the Army network. Cyber defense policy to gain more support The protection of critical Brazilian infrastructure such as hydroelectric power plants, refineries, and telecommunications networks, is one of the critical focus areas for national defense. At least two of the Brazilian Army’s seven current strategic projects are designed to minimize infrastructure threats. “The profiles of the professionals working in the sector range from people with managerial and technical skills in the field of information security to those with qualifications in the legal area and the research and development area, covering members of the Military and civilians,” Lt. Gen. Carvalho added. The Strategic Cyber Defense Project has proved successful in preventing further attacks. The project’s pillar is the Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber), located at Army headquarters in Brasília. Nine sub-projects focus mainly on training human resources as well as on research and development of cyber defense and security tools. The Strategic Cyber Defense Project has proved successful in preventing further attacks. The project’s pillar is the Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber), located at Army headquarters in Brasília. Nine sub-projects focus mainly on training human resources as well as on research and development of cyber defense and security tools. Cyber Operations simulators help train Soldiers “We will work on the protection of Itaipu as a case study, and at the same time, we will seek out national solutions [for cyber defense],” Lt. Gen. Carvalho said during the inauguration ceremony for the laboratory. There are various training strategies for each branch of such skill-mapping, from internships in national civil industries to courses offered by educational institutions of the Armed Forces, such as the Military Institute of Engineering (IME) and the Integrated Electronic Warfare Center (CIGE, for its Portuguese acronym). The CIGE is equipped with the country’s first Cyber Operations Simulator (SIMOC, for its Portuguese acronym), which is to help train teams participating in the Armed Forces’ operations Atlântico IV and Anhanduí later this year. The incident underscored a need that had already been identified by the National Defense Strategy, which in 2008 defined information technology as a strategic sector for Brazil’s defense. In 2011, authorities began to implement the Strategic Cyber Defense Project, which falls under the responsibility of the Brazilian Army. The laboratory is part of the National Information Security and Cryptography Network (RENASIC), one of the Strategic Cyber Defense Project’s 10 sub-projects. Since 2008, when RENASIC was established, eight laboratories have been created throughout the country, in addition to LaSEC². Hundreds of university researchers participate in RENASIC with the goal of increasing Brazilian competencies in Information Security and Cryptography (SIC). Since they can make messages unintelligible and decipher encrypted messages, cryptography techniques play an important role in protecting data from unauthorized access. The hydroelectric power plant, located between Brazil and Paraguay, is responsible for supplying 17 percent and 75 percent respectively of the nations’ consumed energy. Through SIMOC, it is possible to run cyber protection actions in a controlled environment as well as conduct training based on real scenarios of catastrophes and compromises to national infrastructure. Brazilian company Rustcom developed the simulator under guidance from CIGE and it has been in use since 2013. Simulated scenarios have been constantly renewed. There are various training strategies for each branch of such skill-mapping, from internships in national civil industries to courses offered by educational institutions of the Armed Forces, such as the Military Institute of Engineering (IME) and the Integrated Electronic Warfare Center (CIGE, for its Portuguese acronym). The CIGE is equipped with the country’s first Cyber Operations Simulator (SIMOC, for its Portuguese acronym), which is to help train teams participating in the Armed Forces’ operations Atlântico IV and Anhanduí later this year. Cyber Operations simulators help train Soldiers The year 2015 has special importance for the cyber sector in Brazil. Studies and discussions are underway for creation of the National Cyber Defense School and the Cyber Defense Command. The Ministry of Defense stipulated the creation of these organizations in an October 2014 decree (Regulatory Decree 2,777/MD) as part of a series of measures to strengthen the country’s cyber defense policy. The initiative complements efforts being made in this area through the Army’s Strategic Cyber Defense Project. “We will work on the protection of Itaipu as a case study, and at the same time, we will seek out national solutions [for cyber defense],” Lt. Gen. Carvalho said during the inauguration ceremony for the laboratory. The incident underscored a need that had already been identified by the National Defense Strategy, which in 2008 defined information technology as a strategic sector for Brazil’s defense. In 2011, authorities began to implement the Strategic Cyber Defense Project, which falls under the responsibility of the Brazilian Army. In 2014, more than one million attacks against both civilian and military Internet-connected computers were reported throughout Brazil. The majority of these attacks correspond to fraud attempts (44.6 percent ), followed by scans on computer networks to identify targets (25.1 percent) and cyber-attacks to crash the operation of a specific service (21.3 percent). LaSEC² will develop tools for ensuring the security of the federal government’s information assets, using security operations for the Itaipu hydroelectric power plant as a model. Partnership with educational institutions The hydroelectric power plant, located between Brazil and Paraguay, is responsible for supplying 17 percent and 75 percent respectively of the nations’ consumed energy. Both the School and the Command will serve Soldiers from the three branches of Brazil’s Armed Forces, with the Joint Chiefs of Staff coordinating operations. To thwart such attacks, the Military is using the skills of both its and civilian personnel, some of whom provide training on how to detect and stop such assaults. The laboratory is part of the National Information Security and Cryptography Network (RENASIC), one of the Strategic Cyber Defense Project’s 10 sub-projects. Since 2008, when RENASIC was established, eight laboratories have been created throughout the country, in addition to LaSEC². Hundreds of university researchers participate in RENASIC with the goal of increasing Brazilian competencies in Information Security and Cryptography (SIC). Since they can make messages unintelligible and decipher encrypted messages, cryptography techniques play an important role in protecting data from unauthorized access. According to information from SOUTHCOM’s Joint Cyber Center (JCC), CDCiber has collaborated for the past two years with U.S. Army South and the JCC on cyber defense military operation information exchanges. “In the virtual world, there are thousands of attempts to attack Information and Communications Technology (ITC) systems,” said Lieutenant General Paulo Sergio Melo de Carvalho, the head of CDCiber. Data, including that from the Center for the Study, Response, and Treatment of Security Incidents in Brazil (CERT.Br), corroborate “the perception that cyber threats are expanding exponentially with the Internet.” In 2014, more than one million attacks against both civilian and military Internet-connected computers were reported throughout Brazil. The majority of these attacks correspond to fraud attempts (44.6 percent ), followed by scans on computer networks to identify targets (25.1 percent) and cyber-attacks to crash the operation of a specific service (21.3 percent). The National Cyber Defense School will function as a center for National Cyber Defense research and development and include participation of military and civilian institutions and professionals. The Cyber Defense Command is expected to supervise, coordinate, and provide the technical and regulatory guidance for the activities of the Brazilian Cyber Defense System. The Army’s Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber) will focus solely on operations. Brazilian company Rustcom developed the simulator under guidance from CIGE and it has been in use since 2013. Simulated scenarios have been constantly renewed. While Project Proteger is concerned with physical security, the Strategic Cyber Defense Project aims to protect the virtual environment of these strategic structures. One of the project’s most recent initiatives was establishing the Electronic Security Laboratory for Communications and Cybernetics (LaSEC²), which was inaugurated March 3 in the Itaipu Technological Park. LaSEC² will develop tools for ensuring the security of the federal government’s information assets, using security operations for the Itaipu hydroelectric power plant as a model. “In the virtual world, there are thousands of attempts to attack Information and Communications Technology (ITC) systems,” said Lieutenant General Paulo Sergio Melo de Carvalho, the head of CDCiber. Data, including that from the Center for the Study, Response, and Treatment of Security Incidents in Brazil (CERT.Br), corroborate “the perception that cyber threats are expanding exponentially with the Internet.” Through SIMOC, it is possible to run cyber protection actions in a controlled environment as well as conduct training based on real scenarios of catastrophes and compromises to national infrastructure. Both the School and the Command will serve Soldiers from the three branches of Brazil’s Armed Forces, with the Joint Chiefs of Staff coordinating operations. Partnership with educational institutions By Dialogo April 14, 2015 “Given that the development of the simulator is a continuous improvement process, new requirements are being introduced to improve the tool. This year, new scenarios will be developed that meet the specificity of the joint training under the Ministry of Defense,” Lt. Gen. Carvalho added. Cyber defense policy to gain more support In 2011, hackers conducted the first successful attack on Brazilian Army computers. They didn’t manage to compromise strategic information during the attack, but they copied names and personal data of service members. The criminals also demonstrated that they were capable of overcoming a firewall on the Army network. According to information from SOUTHCOM’s Joint Cyber Center (JCC), CDCiber has collaborated for the past two years with U.S. Army South and the JCC on cyber defense military operation information exchanges. To thwart such attacks, the Military is using the skills of both its and civilian personnel, some of whom provide training on how to detect and stop such assaults. The National Cyber Defense School will function as a center for National Cyber Defense research and development and include participation of military and civilian institutions and professionals. The Cyber Defense Command is expected to supervise, coordinate, and provide the technical and regulatory guidance for the activities of the Brazilian Cyber Defense System. The Army’s Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber) will focus solely on operations. “The profiles of the professionals working in the sector range from people with managerial and technical skills in the field of information security to those with qualifications in the legal area and the research and development area, covering members of the Military and civilians,” Lt. Gen. Carvalho added. “Given that the development of the simulator is a continuous improvement process, new requirements are being introduced to improve the tool. This year, new scenarios will be developed that meet the specificity of the joint training under the Ministry of Defense,” Lt. Gen. Carvalho added. The year 2015 has special importance for the cyber sector in Brazil. Studies and discussions are underway for creation of the National Cyber Defense School and the Cyber Defense Command. The Ministry of Defense stipulated the creation of these organizations in an October 2014 decree (Regulatory Decree 2,777/MD) as part of a series of measures to strengthen the country’s cyber defense policy. The initiative complements efforts being made in this area through the Army’s Strategic Cyber Defense Project. While Project Proteger is concerned with physical security, the Strategic Cyber Defense Project aims to protect the virtual environment of these strategic structures. One of the project’s most recent initiatives was establishing the Electronic Security Laboratory for Communications and Cybernetics (LaSEC²), which was inaugurated March 3 in the Itaipu Technological Park. last_img read more

Ministerial Task force for National stadium commences work

first_imgMinisterial Task Force set up by Youth and Sports Development Minister Mr. Sunday Dare will on Monday commence work with the verification of occupants and identification of illegal structures at the complex, even as the Lagos State Commissioner for Physical Planning Dr. Jide Salako has been named as a member of the committee. Dare After so many years of neglect, the Minister had set up the committee headed by the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry Mr. Gabriel Aduda to restore sanity to the complex ahead of the planned concession. While inaugurating the committee, Mr.Dare charged the committee to bring back the lost glory of the edifice. ” The National Stadium, Lagos holds a lot of fond memories for our Sportsmen and other people. We shall no longer allow our infrastructures to lie waste. All our National stadiums shall be put to best use. Abuja and Kaduna are at an advanced stage, Lagos has approval for concession. Before the process is complete, we need to restore sanity to the place. So the work of the task force is cut out. In the past, we had interlopers, now it is going to be fixed to serve our teeming youth. The task force will carry out its assignment according to the law of the land.”Advertisement The terms of reference of the committee include; carry out an audit of approved tenants, verify details of the tenancy agreement, come up with a list of all approved and unapproved physical structures and approved construction, list of all squatters and their business, investigate staff of the Ministry who allow the presence of the squatters, carry out a detailed analysis of all revenue generated at the stadium and take inventory of all shops and businesses within the stadium premises. The committee headed by Mr. Aduda has members are drawn from the Sports Ministry, Lagos State and the organized private sector. Other members of the committee include Dr. Paul Ohido, Director, Sports Medicine, Barrister Mohammed Danjuma, Director, Legal, Mr. Olajide Ajayi TA. To PS, Mr. Sola Aiyepeku, Executive Chairman, Lagos State Sports Commission, Mr. Peter Nelson Director, PMI, Engineer Alanamu Abolore, Director FM/FASD, Engineer Okedairo, DD , SFDA, Alhaji Bode Durotoye, DD/ LO, Lagos, Architect Abiodun Owoborode, Executive Assitant to HM, Benjamin Ukwuoma, CTO, FASD, Mr.Adeolu Fasanya, SAO,/ FASD,Mr Kehinde Owopetu, CSW/SM, Lagos. Others are Idris Oloruninbe, and Abdulgafar Idris representing the organized private sector. read also:Crown FC Appreciate Sunday Dare for Repairing Stadium Pavilion The committee has 21 days to complete its assignment.The Minister had similarly given illegal occupants at the Moshood Abiola National Stadium, Abuja a 25-day ultimatum to quit to enable rehabilitation work to commence. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Promoted ContentThe Best Cars Of All Time7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black HolesIs This The Most Delicious Food In The World?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Body7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your MindWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?10 Stargazing Locations To ‘Connect With Nature’The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More10 Characters That Should Be Official Disney Princesseslast_img read more

No. 2 Notre Dame throttles Syracuse after jumping out to early lead

first_imgQuentin Hillsman wanted his team to set up its press after scoring.Unfortunately for Syracuse, it rarely got the opportunity to do so. No. 2 Notre Dame scored 14 points before the first media timeout.The Fighting Irish (23-0, 10-0 Atlantic Coast) hit seven of its first nine 3s, racing out to a 45-12 lead less than 14 minutes into the game. SU’s zone allowed UND to get open jumper after open jumper, and it left SU (17-7, 6-5) flat-footed with each swish. Notre Dame rode the hot start throughout the game in a 101-64 win over the Orange at Purcell Pavilion in front of 9,149 fans. “We wanted to get some buckets to get our defense set,” Hillsman said. “I thought if we could get back in the half court and get our defense set, we had a chance to guard them.” But SU couldn’t get into any kind of scoring rhythm, and as a result, the Fighting Irish picked apart the SU defense. Kayla McBride swished a 3 with 18:17 left in the first half to give Notre Dame an 8-2 lead. Jewell Loyd hit a jumper in transition 19 seconds later. Then Natalie Achonwa picked up the ball after it bounced off Rachel Coffey’s foot and drove it in for a layup to extend the lead to 10. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the span of 49 seconds, Notre Dame had all but shredded any hope of Syracuse pulling off a monumental upset. “We played unsettled in the first half,” Hillsman said. “We didn’t make our shots.”Loyd had 10 points in the first four minutes and finished with a game-high 23 points. She started out 4-of-4 from the field and finished 9-of-11. While all of Notre Dame’s shots were falling, SU couldn’t find the bottom of the net. Brianna Butler had just three points, and Brittney Sykes was just 5-of-17 from the field, coming off a career-high 31 points against Virginia Tech on Thursday. “They have to get their average for us,” Hillsman said. “Obviously when you’re struggling with scoring, and your two best players are struggling to score the basketball, we’ll struggle as a team.”The closest Syracuse would get in the second half was 28, and Notre Dame would lead by as many as 40. While the Orange has grown used to pressing as a means of starting a run, all the missed shots made that impossible. And when SU did press, Notre Dame found a way to break it. But Hillsman said the game came down to making shots. He said that when Syracuse came back from an 18-point second-half deficit to North Carolina, it was because the Orange was clicking on all cylinders. This time, when the deficit reached double figures, Syracuse wasn’t able to respond. Said Hillsman: “We just didn’t make shots, that was it. I thought we got shots, we didn’t make shots.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 10, 2014 at 1:27 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3last_img read more