Reconstruction Program Aims to Soften Fallout of Natural Disasters

first_img Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Reconstruction Program Aims to Soften Fallout of Natural Disasters Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago June 19, 2017 1,347 Views Tagged with: Build it Back New York Sandy Hook Home / Daily Dose / Reconstruction Program Aims to Soften Fallout of Natural Disasters in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Headlines, Loss Mitigation, News Rachel Williams attended Texas Christian University (TCU), where she graduated with Magna Cum Laude with a dual Bachelor of Arts in English and History. Williams is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, widely recognized as the nation’s most prestigious honor society. Subsequent to graduating from TCU, Williams joined the Five Star Institute as an editorial intern, advancing to staff writer, associate editor and is currently the editor in chief and head of corporate communications. She has over a decade of editorial experience with a primary focus on the U.S. residential mortgage industry and financial markets. Williams resides in Dallas, Texas with her husband. She can be reached at [email protected] A recent report by the New York Daily News examined the success of the city’s Built it Back Program, which restores homes destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. According to the paper, the program has had its highs and lows, with almost three-quarters of construction complete to date but a high drop out rate. As of May 30, the city completed 3,771 homes, closing out 73 percent of all builds on its docket. This is a significant uptick from the year before, which saw only 33 percent of homes completed. However, during this year-long period, 466 homeowners dropped out of the program.The program originally relied on $1.7 billion of federal funds, but recently received a boost of $500 million in HUD funding, putting the total at $2.2 billion.Part of the funds for the Build it Back Program go to elevate the homes so that they are better protected against future flooding, however the paper noted that this has led to discontent among some homeowners who expected to have their original floor plans followed. Due to the elevation requirement some homeowners have lost basement space, but these home now have greater resale value. Other complaints lobbed toward the program include higher than expected out-of-pocket expenses; slow build times; a confusing paperwork process; and comparisons to other programs that offer new builds.“These are families that have really emptied out their life savings to make ends meet and they are literally one emergency away from losing everything. So offering them a smaller amount of money when they’re eligible for a complete home build is outrageous and unacceptable,” said Staten Island Borough President James Otto to the paper.However, program proponents credit Build it Back with being able to move back into their neighborhoods and resume their daily lives.“I think this was one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever gotten, to be honest,” said homeowner Joy Gill, who received a new, elevated home from the program. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Build it Back New York Sandy Hook 2017-06-19 Rachel Williams About Author: Rachel Williams The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Proceed With Caution: Existing Home Sales and Economic Growth Next: Cost of Living Rises in Tandem with Home Prices Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

Fern Miller Stamper, 78, Wellington: June 24, 1934 – June 7, 2013

first_imgFern Miller Stamper, 78, of Wellington, died, Friday, June 7, 2013 at Sumner County Care Center in Wellington.Funeral Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at the First Free Will Baptist Church in Wellington. Visitation will be 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday June 10, 2013 at Hawks-Shelley Funeral Home. Burial will be in the Prairie Lawn Cemetery.A memorial has been established with the Sumner County Care Center and may be left with the Hawks-Shelley Funeral Home. For more information or to leave an online condolence please visit www.hawksfuneralhome.com.Fern was born the daughter of Homer and Virgie (Ragsdale) Miller on June 24, 1934 in Blanchard, Okla. She attended Dibble country school until the 6th grade.  From then on she had to help on the family farm.Fern was united in marriage to Virgle Stamper on May 22, 1961 in Winfield.  In her early years, she enjoyed long walks and gardening.  Pansies were her favorite flowers. Later on in life, she enjoyed listening to gospel radio stations, but the Christian music pleased her the most.  She enjoyed spending time with her grandkids and listening to them. She was a member of the First Free Will Baptist Church in Wellington.She is survived by her children; Joanne Watson and her husband Bob of Salina; Rene Johnson and her husband John of Dunedin, Fla.; Sony Roensch and her husband Tad of Holts Summit, Mo.; Cynthia Woods and her husband Sherman of Medicine Lodge; and Eugene Parrish and his wife Tammy of Wellington; 4 sisters: Marie Miller of Lindsay, Okla.; Wynona Redd of Newcastle, Okla.; Jo Beam and her husband Dan of Alex, Okla.; Lola Williams and her husband Elton of Newcastle, Okla.;  2 brothers: Homer Jr. “Jenks” Miller and Harold Miller of Lindsay, Okla.; and 10 grandchildren.Fern is preceded in death by her parents, and a sister, Faye Miller, and her husband Virgle Stamper on April 3, 2013.last_img read more