Youth Net UK acquires do-it.org domain name

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  26 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 6 October 2004 | News The volunteering site will not change its primary address, but has simply pointed the top-level domain name at the UK address. Third Sector magazine today reports that volunteering resource do-it.org.uk, set up by Youth Net UK, has bought the do-it.org domain name for £1,131 after a four-year effort.The do-it.org domain name, accordig to the magazine, was used by a Saudi businessman for a Web site advertising would-be brides.The top-level domain name version of the UK site’s name was certainly worth acquiring: too often would-be visitors forget to add the .uk suffix, or journalists omit it. Of course, the charity could have saved itself some money by acquiring the key variations on its chosen domain name at the outset, or opting for a different domain name whose variations they could acquire. Advertisementcenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Youth Net UK acquires do-it.org domain name Tagged with: Digitallast_img read more

Oxford scientists don’t need to chill

first_imgOxford scientists have found a method of increasing the shelf life of vaccines, meaning costly refrigeration of drugs in warm climates may no longer be necessary.The research involved drying the viral particles used in vaccinations on ‘special membranes’ in order to keep them stable over longer periods. While usually the drugs last for only a few weeks in warm climates, the scientists found that the methods used in the research could keep the ‘viral vectors’ used in vaccines usable at temperatures of up to 45˚C for several months.The nhs choices website explained, “This development is potentially very useful as it may lead to improvements in the availability and effectiveness of vaccination programmes in areas of the world with fewer resources.”last_img